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presidential election in the united states. there were people people saying it's not this person. tim pawlenty drops off and michele bachmann drops off and left with a last person standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's picking losers. this is not the person. this is not the person. finally you get the last person standing. >> host: process of e elimination. >> which is consistent in whatever organization it is. i think it is in a sense is a simplified version of reality. i think you used a theory. theory start with simple and you make them more complex. if you take ge famous for the way it chooses lards. ge we always tell our students it's a company that works at practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do any of the things we say it should do. it's incredible profitable. if you have to pick them it's good at picking leaders. it's good at developing managers and picking the right people. ge spends twenty years selecting among the organization and slowly promoting them over and over and over again. and so the end of the day, twenty years, so you to work your way up. at the end of
the government, the government suggested you can have our election with them are in the class, and they did a film, and it's absolutely priceless. i mean, the parents, they didn't have to do it because the teachers were not shy to do it. they would make this mistake or that little thing and they would have this comical elements but the students got interested. they got interested. they ended up collecting a monitor. i'm how good the monitor was. but it was all right. it was all right. and so there are ways i think, which are more likely to think of that i am. of taking these different ideas and say try to settle here or try it out over there. you are building the bar, and it's true that there are, none of these things, everything has its drawbacks. move along. >> final two questions. this gentleman right here, and back their. >> ninety. i've been involved in studying practicing chinese law for the last 45 years. i just want to say on a positive note you, justice breyer and also i think others talked and plenty differently which about changing a legal culture in china. and it wanted to menti
. when newt was elected to office in 1978 in georgia, his party, like the republican today was in wilderness. jimmy carter occupied the white house and both the house and senate were safefully democrat hands. the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took control bows the white house and the senate. in the house, where gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman who had an office steps away from newt's. can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was off in a lonely place. the republicans hasn't held a majority there since 1956. there was not a soul alive that could imagine a republican majority again. oh. except for newt. [laughter] with no seniority, but a tireless work ethic, a vision, and a mind filled with idea, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back bench of congress and meth devised a -- once again. it was gingrich that devised the famous contract with america. the plan that gave republicans more than something to run against in the historic 1994 election. he gave them something t
ever win an election? >>guest: he was a senator. he was nominated at the constitutional convention of montgomery alabama. i don't take he did stand for election. but the confederate constitution it was a replica. there was no one term executive that may have spent a five-year to avoid reelection. >>host: professor mccurry was there a lot of political infighting during the war in the south? >> yes there was. the confederacy so quickly was on the ropes things that were planned never materialized. with the political opposition theoretically ever betty was a democrat. you could not vote for abraham lincoln. perhaps in virginia. and during the of war some were profoundly opposed on good grounds the davises ministrations was the most centralized federal a concentrated power in the entire american history. one looked at the union government and the structure of the state's and the confederacy and said that was the lead by a fine state. the united states never had a government that big until the new deal. fin day had to build this enormous central state. think of that. they passed taxes wi
united system with a federal election commission that's completely out of control and with other agencies unable to do anything about it. a lot of money coming in in ways that intimidate political actors until the policy process in a very bad way and the way that will only enhance the quality. one example from north carolina riva group ventures who want to influence the state legislature on a bill prepared a bunch of model commercials that destroyed members of the legislature. when a gc comment had nothing to do a type of culture. it basically defined in this child molesting aliens out to destroy the fabric of america and show them the commercials and said if we don't get what we want millions of dollars could be spent on commercials just like this. they got what they wanted to give him money. the idea this is not correct team from anthony kennedy was on a different planet in a different universe than the real world of what we face. so there's all of that to do with the marketing model legislation written basically by a signature is biggest plugged right in. it's the gilded age brought up
to the president elect, mr. john finley. frost and restated the name of a scholar from harvard. the only new frost. friendly may have been a friend to frost, but finley was no jack kennedy. [laughter] here is a depiction of george washington inauguration, the first one, 1789 which took place in new york city which was our capital of the time. the next two and i eurasia's to press in philadelphia. the first one in washington was in 1801. there is a myth, legend that george washington added the words so help me god at the end of the health. there is no real proof that he said that. nobody ever wrote that he stepped out of those four words of the time, but it has come to be a tradition, at least from 1933 until present, those words have been added at the end of the health. this is 1929, and on the left is chief justice william howard taft. he is investing yield of office to the new president, herbert hoover. taft is the only person ever to be both president and chief justice. and he actually made a little mistake in the of that year. you're supposed to say preserve, protect and defend the constitutio
more establishment name. my own newsletters forecast and strategies. seven robbery and was elected and it has been a great ride. i consider myself a survivor in many ways. i maintained my contacts and the cia because i think there are a good source for information. we're a global economy, and the cia does everything. they've done research on virtually everything. >> we invited you want book tv to talk about the making of modern economics, the lives and ideas of right thinkers. >> cannot in 2001. it took me about five years to sit down and actually right. probably a lifetime of learning. and then the second edition came out in 2009 right after the financial crisis. we felt it needed to be updated after that event because my final chapter is dr. smith goes to washington, the triumph of free-market economics. of course there was a little premature considering what happened since 2008. we had to revise that. >> how is this book organized? >> well, initially when i tried to do was create an alternative to robert popular book of world philosophers. i wish i had that title. it's the story
circumstances. >> this is outside of the book but i will do it anyway because i've been doing general election for the times. talking to jim messina the campaign manager of the obama campaign and david axelrod and rahm emanuel and stephanie cutter and asking them you know, how would the next years under obama, given that the house composition -- >> is almost certainly going to be similar. >> how will things be different and uniformly their answer, in other words the talking point, was that the fever will break, that the american people if they vote for president obama for another four years will basically be voting against obstructionist and the republicans will get the message and they will walk in a sultry fashion toward the center of. >> i can see that happening at all. >> no, no and if that is her talking point and they are siding with the. >> are you optimistic to say that governor romney would have one that there is and you waiting for him after he gets into office? >> no, no i'm not and i wrote a story for "the new york times magazine" on governor romney and specifically on his kind of
consideration to drafting shriver as his running mate in the 1964 election. but the kennedy family so most historians tell us wanted to robert kennedy to assume political leadership, and eventually hubert humphrey to the vice presidency. shortly after the election, johnson asked shriver to head the war on poverty. some of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the of america. the best-selling study of poverty by the holy cross alumni michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appellation and in america's inner cities. shriver is accepted the challenge and got to work first of all research and the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. she found 30 million americans then living in poverty, and his agenda for them was and handouts employment through programs like the preschool head program, a dhaka court to retrain adults for in the dhaka the postindustrial economy and vista volunteers in service to america often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs come stress and community leadership, global planning with federal funds, and there were
for reelection. first elected in 1993 she served three turned in the u.s. senate and will be succeeded by newly elected senator ted cruise. on wednesday senator hutchison gave her farewell speech. it is half an hour. >> i rise today to address this chamber for possibly the last time a senior senator from the great state of texas. i have to say it is an ironic note that if i had given my farewell address last week, there would have been so much joy in the halls of the capital ringing with laughter and anticipation of our season's happiest time. but in just one weekend a sadness has set in with the news of a massacre of innocent children in newtown, conn. followed by the loss of our wonderful colleague, senator daniel inouye. i will leave this extraordinary institution and experience with heavy heart for those that have been lost in the last few days. i do want to thank the people of texas for asking me to represent them in washington. i want to thank the many people who served on my staff for almost 20 years. i have to say i am touched that both benches on both sides of this room are filled with
political transitions that have taken place in terms of going from a non elected it representation and the articulation of goals to an elective -- a transitional government and in an elected government up on the national and the local level. you don't see that elsewhere, at least not as in a striking as fashion. and the rest of the book i talk quite a bit about the personality of qaddafi and what motivated him. many people argued that the personalities of the dictators themselves really don't matter. in the case of libya i think does not quite true. qaddafi was a near kerrville intelligence person in math certain fixations. i tried to be diplomatic here. but they're is a lot of strangeness was motivated his behavior in ways which i think were so bizarre that many of the people who looking at this from the u.s. policy side, not in a way where customers to thinking about things. that posed problems. after 1986 bombing in benghazi and tripoli qaddafi was rumored to have gone into a tremendous fun for several months. if you fast-forward, this is something that looks like it happened af
had no hope. however illusory, that the next election or the other party might turn things around. in fact, there were no elections this absence. authority resided with the teen and parliament. columnist complained that their political leaders were out of touch and it was not a rhetorical florist. no taxation without representation would ultimately become the rallying cry for a war against the most formidable military power on earth. given our current sorry economic circumstances, and bellicose political rhetoric might have its appeal. we could also a member that the exhortations of our forefathers were made on behalf of the desired to forge a nation or group of colonies that even then comprised quite disparate interest. winters and farmers and merchants. slaves, indentured servants and persecuted minorities of all kinds. even after the nation was forged, tough times and were well into the succeeding century. but the citizenry was united in the common purpose to enter into succeeding. to those who forged a system of government, nothing was more important than the maintenance of th
this by electrical means. they had to win an election and they were not at all confident about that coming into was an incredible amount of violence and intimidation that went into it and the results are very uneven. they call a convention and voted up secession by lunchtime on the first day completely unanimously that's how they went out of the union. but what had preceded that? when you are in a meeting and everything is unanimous don't you get a little suspicious? why do. and there was a lot of back story to how they pulled that off. other places the back story really showed. in alabama the country representatives just charged they were being run out of the union of democracy was being completely violated. people in virginia look a was happening in the deep south and said no -- no ordinary farmer has voted for this. that the elites have run our side of the union without the proper consideration of space process, and it really was. it's very -- i think it's interesting that it's very real feeling of what democracy was and meant and the regime and 1860's. they called it a democracy althou
a presidential election. the winner he was president already so he's been filtered for four years, but mitt romney. was he extremely filtered? >> guest: unfiltered without a doubt. in historical is not a lot of time in politics. had he won the presidency, he would've been second second only to wilson and arguably grover cleveland in terms of the shortness of his political career before he became president. >> host: well, listen, thank you. this is a fascinating books. alexis totino, the toes he says he don't know about it. >> guest: thank you very much. the fact that was, but tv signature programs in which authors are interviewed by policymakers, legislators and others familiar with their material. "after words" errors at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click on the booktv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> historian harlow giles unger recounts the life of the six president, john quincy adams who died in 1840. quincy adams, second president had a long career, which aside fro
is to monitor them. and to make suggestions. in the most recent election with the activity taking place the civil-rights commission should have been at the center of the debate based on history, and experience in voting right suppression. it is nowhere to be seen. so what needs to happen it needs to be converted by the congress are they will get rid of it. >> what is the current makeup? >> it is bipartisan. eight members. four and four. no more than four of the same political party. but the they want to appoint somebody they have them change their party and then they appoint to them anyway. the way this structure is now because of ronald reagan, it is hard to get a majority to do anything constructive. they are not supposed to be people who are objective for mine tastes were those two are widely respected there will be aggressive or catering to their party. >>host: who is the chair? >> i have no idea. i've no idea what it is doing i assume nothing. it has been, since i left i have no idea. >>host: why did you leave in 2007? >>guest: my term would be up in january, said 2004. when bush w
presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt, in the south and southwest that we see the rise of what we see by the 1970s is becoming to talk about as the religious right, the rise of evangelical involved in the clinical process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in
of the 20,000 election about the commission has never been the same. so reagan in a sense succeeded in making it a body that couldn't listen and was not independent and kept trying commissioners to endorse whatever the administration said. i said if you're going to do the committee of cabinet officers and people putting political appointees whose job is to do that. your job is to monitor them until the public what they are doing and make suggestions for how things should be improved. right now in the most recent election, voter suppression activities at a place in the whole debate about it, the civil rights commission should at the center of that debate based on its history, experience with voting and voting rights suppression and making recommendations. it is nowhere to be seen. so what it was done has subverted the mission is supposed to have and what needs to happen if you need to be converted by the congress into another body or some thing are they had to get rid of it. that's my opinion. host or with the current makeup of the u.s. commission? >> guest: the commission has eight
, writes to the next election. they have their own agenda. they don't respond to the marketplace the way business has to do. they have their own agenda of interest groups. the bigger they get, the more harm they do on the less chance you have to improve your lot in life. >> host: how is it free markets make it moral? is morality part of capitalism? >> guest: morality is the basis of capitalism. the whole thing about free markets based on values in meeting the needs and wants of other people. contrary to the hollywood cartoon terra of business people rubbing their hands in "glee" at the misery of others. even if you for money, you don't get it unless you provide a product or service if somebody else wants. so without us even realizing it, it enhances humanity. you have to create cooperation. you have to get people to work with you. you have to persuade. so in that sense, free markets open nothing can go do something. by golly you have the chance to do it and it brings barriers we take it for granted if you start the business and get the best people possible. that's a truism. but the pheno
presentation by informing them that his poetry had been dedicated to the president-elect, mr. john finley [laughter] frost had inadvertently stated the name of a scholar from harvard. findlay new frost and may have been a friend of frost. but he was no jack kennedy. [laughter] here's a picture of washington's inauguration the first one in 79 that place in the capitol at the time. the next inaugurations took place in philadelphia and the first one in washington was in 1801. now there is a mess, a legend of the george washington so help me god at the end of the los. but there is no proof that he said that. out of the four words at the time it's come to be a tradition at least from 1933 to the present those words have been added at the end of the los. this is 1929 coming in on the left is the chief justice william howard taft and he is administering the oath of office to the new president herbert hoover. he's the only person ever to be both president and chief justice and you're supposed to say preserve, protect and defend the constitution that he said cruisers, maintain and defend and this
that message out from the political sphere? >> you know, you get the elected officials you deserve, and i know this. i'm a politician. they respond to pressure. they respond to incentives, and so we always push the attention to washington or to trenton, albany or city hall. we can exercise pressure. we have the power to pressure, demand, influence our elected officials so we have to get active if we're going to have a society to respond to the enduring problem. the rate of child poverty in the united states of america, we should be shamed that a nation this strong has child poverty, and kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, nutritionally fit to learn, material ready to learn, and that's the lie or that's the incompleteness we have to address. when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in affluent neighborhoods, and they say those words, "liberty and justice for all," when they pledge allegiance to the flag, that should be a command, should be a compelling aspiration, and there should be a conscious conviction amongst us to make that real, but righ
it to the congress. the outcome of the election came before my book came out. but i was worried and i thought it was a legitimate concern in the senate should know about it. he said don't worry. he said you know, everybody knows that my father had an affair. and he said i know my father wasn't anti-semite. whatever you find whatever you rate is going to be sure for the man i knew and loved them without their. so i said okay. i want full access to everything. i want full access to the family, two of the documents, to everything stored it became belaboring boston but spend close to researchers. and you will see the book come to you in the family and your lawyers and representatives will see the book when it is between hard covers, not before. i won't be coming back to you for permission to cite anything. whatever i find them going to use in the book. he said okay. then it took 18 months to get the solid writing and i was off and running. and i found some more remarkable story that i even imagined i would find. i found the story of a man who spent his life moving back and forth have been an outs
no one thought they would. in the last two elections, a majority of greek people did not vote for either of those parties. try to understand what it would mean if a majority of americans voted for night of the republicans or democrats. in the last election the two major parties of greece, new democracy and the socialist party together got under 40% of the vote. and the explosive new party is a party that is a far left wing party that is against all austerity programs and wants to solve greece's problems by taking wealth away from the traditional greek ridge. this is a party that until this year didn't get more the 2% or . this is a party that until this year didn't get more the 2% or 3% of thech . this is a party that until this year didn't get more the 2% or 3% of the. this is a party that until this year didn't get more the 2% or 3% of the boat. the government agrees -- there's a lot, under greek law whatever party comes in first, take a step back, greece has proportional representation that deserves a word of comment. proportional representation is the peculiar idea that if you get a
in the election. he wins the popular vote but the electoral college flips in the loses the popular vote. i'm speaking speaking of palm beach counties so you know about the scenarios. checks and wins the popular vote. he comes back in four years in 1828 in beats john quincy adams and in 1828 is probably the second nastiest election in american history. of course with this current one being the nastiest with a negative ads and such. there's no love lost -- loss. jackson supporters don't call john quincy adams your excellency. they call him your fraudulent seat. they call jackson a white thief and his wife a of tennessee sohtz is huge scandal to the point that rachel donaldson jackson becomes increasingly religious every passing year. to the point where now all of the scandal about her really affecting her mental health and physical health. she is hoping and praying that jackson does not win, that she doesn't have to go to the white house sewer scandal becomes a national story. she is hoping and writing letters. she doesn't want to go there. right after jackson wins the election, before the i
be playing, and what do you think of president-elect obama's plans for appointing judges? >> guest: well, i'm a little -- i would be even more concerned about obama's view of judges except for the fact that the likely resignations from the supreme court are the liberals. they're the age to begin retiring. so his appointments would probably be younger liberals replacing older liberals on the supreme court. where obama's views are going to be, have real impact are in the lower federal courts. now, that's important because almost none, almost none of the cases in the lower federal courts get to the supreme court. i forget, there are tens of thousands of cases every year in the lower federal courts, and the supreme court takes about 80 which means that most to have laws being made by lower courts which obama will have a chance to, to affect. and he has said that he wants judges -- in the first place, he says that the law is clear in all but 1% of the cases which is definitely not true. wouldn't be any room for argument if it was that clear. but he says in those cases where the law isn't clear,
why that many people are living like that. elections and we have a new government. a lot of it is promised has not come through. but people have individual efforts and how, in some ways -- they have picked themselves up last week that they can. but it is a question that we have to keep asking and something that we have to model allows people to get that for example, hurricane sandy 80 people are not happy with what he something like that that inner-city when you are living in a tent. there is something like 74,000 acres of land we are still going dealing with a very urgent and difficult situation in haiti. >> host: where did your book, "so spoke the earth" come from? >> guest: it came from women writers of haitian descent. it is the navigation of patients to tell their stories and these groups of women, the edited this anthology. it is "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know." different women talk about this. it is a trilingual anthology in english, french, and creole. it's generational. we talk about the people who were surviving
on elective officials. we have to get much more active to have a city to respond to the rate of child poverty we should be shamed and nation the strong and kids in poverty don't have the access to success with material and that is the completeness to address and when kids stand up and they say the words liberty and justice for all that it should be a command with a compelling aspiration and to make that real but we are lacking that sense of urgency when i think of great movements in america we were not led by a officials to respond to the leadership in the ground. when we think of voting conversations had rehab and entire presidential debate and the word party is not what we should talk about? i hope we can change the dialogue. i would like to do a balance sheet analysis of the country. the manhattan institute works with us with the balance sheet analysis for every $1 spent on staff it is a multiplier effect. about $1.70 of job creation and also with programs for kids. it produces an economic results so things will change. campaigning for president obama in seattle with it amazing support org
of democracy in burma creating the lead for democracy, elections followed in 1990 when her party won 80% but that joy turned to tragedy and the the military junta and aung san suu kyi spent 3 decades under house arrest unable to visit her dying husband. in 1996 i recall senator bill cohen approaching with senator mccain to sponsor a burma sanction bill, sanctions were put in place in 1997 and only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates and we continue to work on behalf of the people of burma. in 2003 following an assassination attempt senator mcconnell and i worked to pass an important man the remains in place today, an effort to bring about further reform and i must say burma is extremely lucky to have a champion like aung san suu kyi. in the face of violence, intimidation, harassment, she has never wavered from her principles or ceased her push for democracy and human rights. she celebrates the relief of political prisoners including approximately 90 released this week but she remains true to them to remain behind bars, a numb
? >> well, you know, you get the elected officials you deserve. and they -- and i know this, i'm a politician. they respond to pressure. and they respond to incentives. and unless, so we always push the attention to washington or to trenton, albany or city hall, but we can organize. we have the power to exercise pressure, demands, influence on our elected officials. and so we have to get much more active if we're going to have a society that's going to respond to this enduring problem. the rate of child poverty in the united states of america we should be shamed that a nation this strong has child poverty and that kids in poverty don't have the access to success, good education, few traditionally-fit to learn -- nutritionally-fit to learn, materially ready to learn. and that's the lie, or that's the incompleteness that we have to address. that when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods and they say those words, liberty and justice for all, when they pledge allegiance to our flag, that that phrase, "liberty and justice for all,"
wherever he could. he applied for a job in chicago after washington was elected mayor there. he didn't get anything. so the best he could do was stay in new york. he wouldn't want to go back to honolulu. he didn't have anyplace else. so he stayed there and as he put it, you try to make money for yourself and get a job. it is sort of a magazine or consulting firm called business international. for that year, he doesn't really like it there, but that is the period when they talk a lot. it is the period when he met genevieve. >> host: so david maraniss, going back to the quote, no life could have been the product of randomness like that of barack obama. chicago became a part of that randomness? >> guest: well, the mayoral election in chicago was very attracted to him. and chicago was the place to be at that time. oprah winfrey, michael jordan, the king of the bulls, oprah winfrey had her show, and barack obama who came anonymously. and he is arguably today's most influential. >> host: in chicago community organizer, you quote him. saying that obama was one of the most cautious people i ever m
. >> thomas mann, did the 2012 elections clarify anything? >> by all appearances, it was a status quo election, returning us to the division of power; obama in the white house, democrats in control of the senate, republicans of the house. but appearances can be deceiving, and in this case are. the most important reality of the election is that the republican effort to oppose anything and everything proposed by obama -- almost like a parliamentary party -- was not rewarded. the taking the debt ceiling hostage was not rewarded, calling the obama health care plan which was their own only a few years earlier socialism was not rewarded. that was not they have to begin to rethink themselves and, importantly, democrats will not automatically embrace the same tactics in opposition. so i think that was an important change that creates a new dynamic not that's going to solve our problems. there's going to be no sitting around the campfire in washington making nice to one another. but the possibility now exists for a real effort and a successful effort to deal with our most pressing problems. >> two fami
hope this book will become the focus of discussion about the economy during the election campaign and beyond. it's about growth and freedom. today we have a short discussion appear among three contributors to the book. i want to introduce my good friend and former colleague, kevin hassett, american enterprise institute, formerly senior economist at the fed. he read a great chapter on the path to growth, focusing on spending, taxes and certainty. next come on the far end, jason fichtner, senior research fellow at the mercator center at george mason university and former chief economist of deputy commissioner during president bush's term of the social security administration. and he wrote a superb chapter on how social security should be reformed to encourage growth. finally, as president bush, our editorial friend, brendan miniter who edited this book. i want the opportunity to thank contributors to the book who are here today. additional contributors who aren't on the panel. raise your hand -- she read about immigration. richard palm of smu and michael cox of smu are both here. an
at ole miss. well, it was not. it was a group of students who didn't like the results of the election, but just a handful of them were throwing out racial slurs, screaming. so that has to be in context. ralph alluded to mississippi today. there's an education presentation, mississippi was, mississippi is. it means they've changed in a way that i think a lot of the northern press was not aware of and was not aware of the racial issue then and probably not aware now. the army had been, thank you, harry truman, the army had been desegregated to a point by the time i got in in 1962 it was flattened out. there was no -- there may have been racism back in the barracks and the tents, but it's not out in the open. alabama pfcs saluted black officers, took the orders from black sergeants. once we left the comfort of the army bases and the posts as we moved south, it was a different culture. that we got into. and, of course, it was a freeze frame, a photograph, a snapshot of rayism that we saw that -- racism that we saw that first morning and continued to see while we were there. so kudos to th
in the count from journalists traveling with the troops. elected the image more closely. first of all, what phil was from baltimore. notice how he places slave's right up at the front and center . a think he's asking you think about, and if you look to the edge you can see a guy who is tossing a match into a barrel suggesting, what is mexico really going to do except set off a firestorm which is an average from baltimore about the war. another major critique of the war had to do with what people saw as the impact of service in mexico on the american character people worry that the mexican war was making the american character bourse. it was degrading american soldiers and turning them into the kind of people that we really didn't want to to be. this critique became especially strong after reports of very bad behavior by american troops making it to u.s. newspapers which i see happening about the middle of 1847. particularly in northern mexico, the volunteers are a total of about the age extern the badly, murdering civilians in the street, raping women, reports of entire villages being burne
at the time until late into the 20th century. and so they not only falsified the elections that followed -- that preceded independence. they falsified even the census. if you check the annals of the home office -- the so-called home office which is where the colonies of british administered, look for the book of harold smith. one of the civil servants in nigeria. he got into problem because he didn't want to carry out orders. and the falsification of the first election. and then short the power was handed over to what they considered the backward north. the feudal north. the west, the southern part, west and east, were considered suspect. they were radicalized, western ideas. so they left -- that political dishonesty led to very long story -- i'll cut it short -- but led eventually to the very first military coup, which was led by certain southerners. there was a reprisal, countercoup and then a series of battles which led eeventually to the secession of the eastern part because they were the larger victims, were singled out for having initiated the school and for killing, auldly, not th
elected civilian that lived in the white house. mcclellan himself toyed with the idea of. quote, i almost think if i were to win a small success now i could become teeter. he wrote to his wife. and he andy gloried in his newspaper nickname, the young napoleon. he then posed for official photographs with his hands tucked into his tunic. added cabinet meeting on new year's eve, the joint congressional committee on the conduct of the war spent more than 90 minutes asking hard questions about the situation and lincoln's answers left everyone shocked and unnerved. afterwards, attorney general edward bates setup into the night filling page after page of his diary. quote, the secretary of war and the president are kept in ignorance of the actual condition of the army and its intended movements bates confided. the blame he concluded lay with abraham lincoln. an excellent man wrote bates and in the main wise but he lacks will and purpose and i greatly fear he has not the power to command. over the next 12 months, the civil war became a cataclysm. the federal government became a -- in the confedera
. for the election of harold washington as the first african-american mayor of chicago was very attractive to him. chicago was the place to be at that point as i right in the book. three people arrived in chicago, michael jordan came during that period, and barack obama came anonymously and arguably today. >> host: jerry gelman, a chicago community organizer, said obama was one of the most cautious people i have ever met in my life. he was not unwilling to take risks but was a strange combination of someone who would have to weigh everything to death and then take a dramatic risk at the end. >> guest: that sounds like president obama too. in some ways that characteristic can be looked at in his life and career. as a community organizer, the whole notion, the method for community organizing was to take action, our does not exist in a vacuum. youpower does not exist in a vacuum. you have to seize it. cameron was one of his bosses during that period, barack was a different story. he was looking for ways to not confront but achieved in other ways. that can be frustrating at times but help him get whe
after political scientists say the time between election day nov. inauguration day is 11 weeks, that is too short a time for a president to get ready to assume office. lyndon johnson had two hours and six minutes in which he was sworn in on the plane, air force one, let's get airborne and landed in washington. he had to get off of the plane, ready to be president of the united states. to see him step in with no preparation at all, when president kennedy's legislative program, civil rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they had been controlling it for a quarter of the century, to see him get the program up and running, ramming it through to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he now knows all of the levers to pull, but has the will, lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i am doing the research, look what he is doing here.
and they nudged people at the election polls and got them to vote for the way broderick wanted to achieve things. he figured out that nobody was missing money. he figured out he could do well. he is now in san francisco on christmas eve. he is seeing the city for the first time. i will give you this little bit, and i will see how this goes. in san francisco, roderick awaken before dawn. many had trailed after san francisco. the early morning stillness had made him contemplative. it is independently wealthy. so what was he to do now? went to the window, still recovering from the onus that he had contracted which kept him from his friend, stephen said. pulling aside the curtain, he saw the rain had stopped. it was a godsend. northeast of san francisco, four fifths of san francisco lay underwater. allowing passengers to enter their second city story hotel room by window. the 50 inches of icy wind and shotgun blast of black hail that had pummeled san francisco all winter had not misspelled the dreams of its citizens. they talked. heads filled with nightmares of what would happen when the downpour en
that people are granted 2010 it got elected or the people ran before and it now ascended to positions of leadership believes that go with a solution or they were like that to not do things i supposed to do things? >> well, again, from a class of 2010 and our effort to the the 87 freshman, the so-called tea party class of the 112 congress, their belief is they are doing precisely what the people who elected them did, which is rolled back obama initiatives, cut spending. a lot that the debt ceiling should not be increased under a circumstances where they feel like i was a failure. but they basically believe their job is first to obstruct barack obama and once there is a republican president in place to pass this initiatives that create better business climate. more and more deregulation committee funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. i think they do believe -- of course to fast-forward a bit about the debt ceiling fiasco of 2011, but after the summer we were taken to the brink of a fiscal cliff, one we are about to see it it can come in to thinking part o
of a lot of our work that we feel is necessary. >> thomas mann did the 2012 elections clarify anything? >> by all appearances, it was a status quo election. returning us to the division of power, obama and the white house, democrats in control of the senate and republicans in the house. but appearances can be deceiving and in this case they are. the most important reality of the election is that the republican effort to oppose anything and everything proposed by obama, almost like the parliamentary party, was not rewarding and taking the debt ceiling hostage was not rewarded. calling the obama health care plan, which was their own only a few years earlier, socialism was not reported. that means they have to begin to rethink themselves and importantly, democrats will not automatically embrace the same tactics in opposition, so i think that was an important change that creates a new dynamic, not that it's going to solve our problems. there's going to be no sitting around the camp liar and washington making nice to one another, but the possibility now exists for a real effort and a succes
whole that lives in its own bubble and things that we have seen that in the last election. they simply couldn't believe what they were saying that obama was probably going to win and that most democratic senate candidates were going to win. they were shellshocked in their own words, and if they cannot sort of accept the in critical reality, they are going to be in big trouble in the succeeding election. >> democrats became useless? >> well, they become useless and that they become the party of me too but less in that after three successive losses in the presidential elections in the 80's they kind of retool and become more friendly and many people think, and i happen to be one of them, for all but obama has excoriated as a kind of muslim and socialist that once, she's pretty much fulfiled george bush's third term in the national security matters. >> finally how does the middle class figure in to your thesis? >> the middle class figures and they are the ones that got shafted because there was a bipartisan move. clinton was president, the republicans mainly were running the congress when
to read because it is, it's an emergency book. i wanted it to come out before the election. it's a brief history of racial demagoguery, from the left, and to point out that it's never produced whitefield is only produced disaster, heartbreak, crime, death. it has been a disaster for america. most of all for black people, and to the point of it is to say don't fall for white guilt again, america. the last time you fell for it was in 2008, and look what that produced. so don't fall for it again but don't make the same mistake again. and also i think it's a fun book to read. most of it will be stored you have never read before. thank you and i will sign your books now. [applause] >> is this yours? >> know, that's a mine. >> thanks. thank you. are you leaving? >> i have to. spent it's your fault we didn't get to mingle. >> i know. i'm sorry. >> i got to come back to d.c. that's all i'm getting from you? >> you already got enough from me. spent i was just telling my friend how i tell all the whippersnappers, you hang on islands everywhere. you was the one and you just don't even care about th
emerged victorious in the 20 election. that's good for kids, right? and q., thank you. and then heavenly bodies is of course a feast for the eyes offering artful nude photos of this year's nominee to run. robert carroll gets the centerfold. all right, on that note we go to young peoples literature. [applause] him to present the national book award in young peoples literature is gary d. schmidt. [applause] now, i did my due diligence on mr. schmidt, and i could not find anywhere in wikipedia or elsewhere online what his middle name is. but if another one of his obvious is cutting and splitting wood. in addition, gary d. schmidt is author of the newberry honor and -- the newbery honor winning the wednesday awards and okay for now, a national book award finalists in 2011, and it gives me great pleasure to introduce gary d. schmidt. ♪ >> good evening. over these last few months i've had the privilege of being the chair of the committee organized to choose national book awards for young peoples literature. in these months we read something over 325 books for young readers ranging from ficti
in the timely topics of a political nature as the election season really showed, they could get the news out in a wider way within the e-book than if they had to wait several months or a year for work. i >> host: i thought michael grunwald new book, the new new deal should've gotten more attention than it did. i found it very and she seen it was not the kind of stuff you are reading the newspapers or magazines or seen discussed in tv. grunwald writes for "time" magazine. he's a nonpartisan and it's an appreciation of what the stimulus not only did good for the economy, but what it means for the environment. it's a story that's gotten lost on the politics. >> host: we have to have your comment as an employee of "usa today." we have to have you comment on u.s.a. tomorrow. guess what i should think sir for her plug for that. the newspaper in september was 30 years old from this little bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world be like 30 years from now, which would leave, what are we talking about, 2042? fare as his little better that than i am. anyway,
an extraordinary job. in election season, i find it fascinating to listen to my father talk about what kind of person succeeds in politics. he believed the time for changing, and he was right for the time. it is interesting to apply his standards to the current campaign. he talks about the odds of people with money succeeding in politics and about whether objects come to play. find his standards to today, i know where i come down. i encourage you to make up your own mind. as his child, i cherish the parts were my brother and i appear on the tape. i remember walking into the office before school in the morning and visiting him in the afternoon so that we could play under his desk. it was the highlight of the day for john and me. and the delight in my father's voice shows that he felt the same way. i felt fortunate to be able to listen in on his meetings and to be able to hear his mind at work. his tone of voice, his chuckle and frustration, and most of hall, his sense of purpose. what comes through is that politics is a way of his solving problems and nothing is more rewarding than giving pa
. years that began with the 2003 recount and reended with re-election of president obama. if you could think of the adjective to describe these years what would it be? >> clearly interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. but also full of opportunities for the country. there was some good times during the twelve years laced together with some that weren't so good. 9/11, the anthrax scare. there were positive things as well, the election of president obama, i thought it was a positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way that we have tried to move forward out of face -- fiscal as by now we came out of a fiscal as by during the times. it's a hodgepodge during at love different things. i couldn't imagined to have been here during a better time. >> let me get deeper and ask you tell me what was the high point of the entire service? >> the high point was when we can work together. and maybe the single event that process that would embody that was the gang of fourteen. when we put together with john mccain i put together six other democrats and six other republ
christian community in southern sudan right outside of cuba. to prepare them for election by bringing in thousands of solar-powered radios so that the folks in that region of the sudan would have information about the outside world in preparation for elections for independence. as you know southern sudan is the newest country in the world. on january 1, 2008, new year's new year's day, at 6:45 in the morning i received a call from john's mother, who informed me that the night before john was killed. he was actually murdered by gunmen while driving home from the british embassy for a new year's eve party in khartoum. john was ambushed by two gunmen who sat in their car, in front of his. john was shot in the neck and the chess. the attack followed warnings by the united nations that a terrorist cell, in sudan, was planning to attack westerners. no one blames the president. nobody attacked the national security adviser. what john's mother wanted was a response from our nation and our community with let's get to the bottom of this so it will never happen again. it's my understanding that
, was elected in 2009. i am 38. this is where you say i look much younger than that. [laughter] i love coming to this space, good lighting. [laughter] but i think, again, i can speak to this personally because now that i am an elected official, the only woman serving on that body and the first woman of color in that body in its history -- mass. [applause] now, why does that matter, why is that relevant? i appreciate the applause, it has nothing to do with a personal achievement. i think it's a shared victory for all of us. it means that the solutions we're developing in government are more comprehensive and fully informed because of that perspective. so i've thought a great deal about this issue of attraction and retex, but more than that, how do we keep native bostonians? because we were losing young people who had been, who were raised here who were going someplace else. they do come back, though, i have to say that. they sort of go on this pill grammage to see what is out there, but they do come back. and so to ed's point and barbara's as well around social issues, this is an issue i'm wor
uncomfortable. thank you. and let's applaud all of this year's nominees. [applause] >> with the election behind us and the fiscal cliff right in front of us, i think it's nice just to have an evening when we can focus on what is important, like whether molly ringwald is really here tonight. is she? i trust you all read "the new york times" piece this past week on how tonight is part of a close, visible makeover for the national book awards them article goes on to say the goal is to add more sex appeal to an industry that is not exactly known for it. and there will be signs everywhere of the aspirations to turn this once dowdy event into a glamorous party. from where i stand, looking out at your sexy, sexy faces,-you are post-dowdy. thank you. that's the drinking table. it's fun to tell jokes outside of new york that you're involved with the nba because people start can go you questions about what lebron and kobe are really like. it's really an understandable confusion because writers and professional ballers are incredibly similar. they're both wildly overpaid people, in peak physical condition
bubble. i think we have seen that in the last election. they simply could not believe the public polls, what they were saying that obama was probably going to win and most democratic senate candidates were going to win. they were shellshocked in their own words. and if they could not accept empirical reality they are going to be in big trouble in the succeedinsucceedin g elections. see the democrats became useless? >> well they become useless and they have become kind of the party of me to but less in that after three successive losses in presidential elections in the 80's, they kind of retooled and became more corporate friendly. many people think, and i happen to be one of them, for all that obama has excoriated as the kind of canyon usurper who is a muslim and
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